Home » Best Motorhome Tires for Drought, Rain and Snow – All-Weather Tires Guide

Best Motorhome Tires for Drought, Rain and Snow – All-Weather Tires Guide

Best Motorhome Tires for Snow, Rain and Drought - All-Weather Tires Guide

Winters are getting milder, motorhome tire changes are becoming more and more expensive and the cold season is less attractive as a travel season anyway. There is a lot to be said for motorhome all-weather tires that can be used all year round.

All-weather tires are enjoying growing popularity. Last year around 18 percent of all new tires sold for passenger cars, light commercial vehicles and camping vehicles were approved for all weather conditions.

Dedicated tires for snow, ice and wet roads still hold around 50 percent of the market.

However, the number of summer tires sold in the open market fell to 32 percent.

In order to see what motorhome tires to use all year around, we chose 7 candidates from the best tire manufactures and compared them in all-weather conditions: snow, rain, and dry asphalt (to simulate drought).

The chosen tires are: Continental VanContact 4Season, Michelin Agilis CrossClimate, Pirelli Carrier All Season, Falken Euro All-Season Van 11, Goodyear Vector 4Seasons Cargo, Maxxis Vansmart A/S AL2 and Vredestein Comtrac 2 Allseason

Where did the trend towards motorhome all-weather tires come from?

winter all-season summer motorhome tires

One of the reasons for the trend towards the all-seasons tires, as the all-weather tires are also often called, is definitely climate change, which is becoming more and more noticeable basically everywhere. Added to this is the significant increase in vehicle and service costs.

Just buying a winter wheel set, for a normal sized motorhome like the Fiat Ducato used in our tests, including assembly and the recommended tire pressure sensors, can reach $1200.

Tire changes from winter to summer tires and back, which occur twice a year, also have to be taken into account together with the associated costs. As a result, more costs and more effort, might suggest the use of all-season tires, especially on a camper van that does not necessarily have to be moved in winter.

Advantages and Disadvantages of All-Weather Tires for Motorhomes

Earlier tests have shown that all-weather tires cannot match the performance and grip of modern winter tires on snow and ice, so they are at a disadvantage compared to summer tires, especially on hot summer days.

Due to their naturally somewhat softer mixture when warm, they are not as stable, which is noticeable in longer braking distances and reduced cornering strength. In addition, they wear out faster and are what they are: a compromise.

But with this compromise you also have advantages during summer. For example, the coarser, more transverse grooves, tread blocks and sometimes with fine incisions, the sipes, embossed tread – at least with a good tread depth – shows significantly better traction on loose or slippery surfaces. For example when it comes to driving a heavy, front-wheel drive motorhome out of the rain-soaked campsite.

In addition, all-wather motorhome tires are usually better protected against the dangerous floating on rain-soaked roads, known as aquaplaning, even though this is often only a factor in heavy motorhomes.

But that ends with the general advantages of all-weather tires. How they are constructively prepared by their manufacturers for the different road conditions such as snow, wet or hot summer asphalt and how their individual weighting turns out, is very different.

This guide will show how the seven chosen all-weather motorhome tires differ and which one is best suited for your individual requirements from our point of view.

All-Wather Motorhome Tires Test Candidates and Evaluation

The seven motorhome tires were each tested for braking performance, cornering, grip and handling. Here is how the tests were conducted:

Snow Test:

  • Braking power: Full braking with the ABS system from 50-10 km/h on a frozen blanket of snow. Braking distance is expressed in meters.
  • Lateral guidance: measurement during slalom drive. The average maximum lateral acceleration is given.
  • Traction: tensile force when attempting to drive on a homogeneously packed snow cover. Acceleration is expressed in m/s².
  • Handling: On a snow-covered circuit (1600 m), time is driven. Average speed expressed in km/h.

Wet Conditions Test:

  • Braking power: ABS full braking 80-0 km/h on irrigated asphalt.
  • Lateral guidance: Irrigated asphalt circle, diameter: 80 meters. Maximum lateral acceleration in m/s².
  • Handling: On the 1800 meter long handling course, the maximum average speed in km/h counts.
  • Longitudinal aquaplaning: The floating speed is determined when driving straight ahead in km/h with 15% slip.
  • Aquaplaning across: adhesion when driving through water in a 200 m circle (VDA). The lateral acceleration is evaluated in m/s².

Dry Asphalt Test:

  • Braking power: ABS full braking 100-0 km/h on dry asphalt. Average of ten valid attempts.
  • Handling: On a circuit, driving safety and lap time are what count. Average speed is expressed in km/h.
  • Rolling resistance: The rolling resistance coefficient in kg/t is determined on a stationary roller test bench.
  • Rolling noise: Rolling noise of the tires on ISO standard asphalt with the engine switched off at 80 km/h.

All tests were conducted with a Fiat Ducato fully loaded.


Continental VanContact 4Season

Pros:

  • Very good grip
  • Very good turning and braking on snow
  • Easily controllable in wet conditions
  • Very good grip in dry corners
  • Pleasantly quiet

Cons:

  • Weak posture when braking on dry asphalt

Snow Test:

  • Braking power: 18.3 meters – very good
  • Lateral guidance: 3.47 m/s² – very good
  • Traction: 1.72 m/s²- very good
  • Handling: 44 km/h – very good

Wet Test:

  • Braking power: 37.9 meters – good
  • Lateral guidance: 6.08 m / s² – good
  • Handling: 63.9 km / h – good
  • Longitudinal aquaplaning: 74.5 km / h – good
  • Aquaplaning across: 3.76 m / s² – good

Dry Asphalt Test:

  • Braking power: 49.5 meters – below average
  • Handling: 86.1 km / h – very good
  • Rolling resistance: 6.8 kg / t – very good
  • Rolling noise: 71.3 db (A) – very good

Michelin Agilis CrossClimate

Michelin Agilis CrossClimate

Pros:

  • Good grip in snowy corners
  • Aquaplaning safe
  • Balanced, safe driving behavior with very short braking distances on dry asphalt

Cons:

  • Poorly balanced traction / cornering ratio on snow
  • Strong tendency to understeer in wet corners

Snow Test:

  • Braking power: 19.1 meters – average
  • Lateral guidance: 3.47 m / s² – very good
  • Traction: 1.61 m/s² – average
  • Handling: 44.2 km/h – good

Wet Test:

  • Braking power: 36.6 meters – good
  • Lateral guidance: 5.78 m/s² – below average
  • Handling: 62.5 km/h – average
  • Longitudinal aquaplaning: 76.9 km/h – good
  • Aquaplaning across: 3.98 m/s² – very good

Dry Asphalt Test:

  • Braking power: 43.7 meters – very good
  • Handling: 85.2 km/h – good
  • Rolling resistance: 7.2 kg/t – good
  • Rolling noise: 71.7 db (A) – good

Pirelli Carrier All Season

Pirelli Carrier All Season

Pros:

  • Safe in wet conditions
  • Good protection against aquaplaning
  • Very safe and cornering handling on dry asphalt

Cons:

  • With very poor grip (devaluation due to braking distances that are too long) on snow, largely unsuitable for winter driving.

Snow Test:

  • Braking power: 23.1 meters – insufficient
  • Lateral guidance: 2.84 m/s² – insufficient
  • Traction: 1.39 m/s² – insufficient
  • Handling: 37.9 km/h – insufficient

Wet Test:

  • Braking power: 37.2 meters – good
  • Lateral guidance: 6.07 m/s²- good
  • Handling: 63.8 km/h – good
  • Longitudinal aquaplaning: 76.3 km/h – good
  • Aquaplaning across: 3.82 m/s² – good

Dry Asphalt Test:

  • Braking power: 46.1 meters – good
  • Handling: 86.2 km/h – very good
  • Rolling resistance: 7.0 kg / t – good
  • Rolling noise: 71.4 db (A) – good

Falken Euro All-Season Van 11

Falken Euro All-Season Van 11

Pros:

  • Mostly safe driving characteristics on snow
  • With a very sedate steering response, it is insensitive to quick lane changes

Cons:

  • Longer braking distances and reduced cornering grip on wet and dry asphalt
  • Rumbling in roll-off comfort
  • Humming rolling noise

Snow Test:

  • Braking power: 19.1 m – good
  • Lateral guidance: 3.42 m/s²- good
  • Traction: 1.67 m/s² – good
  • Handling: 43.8 km/h – good

Wet Test:

  • Braking power: 39.8 meters – below average
  • Lateral guidance: 5.86 m/s² – below average
  • Handling: 62.9 km/h – average
  • Longitudinal aquaplaning: 72.1 km/h – average
  • Aquaplaning across: 3.74 m/s² – good

Dry Asphalt Test:

  • Braking power: 49.3 meters – average
  • Handling: 83.2 km/h – below average
  • Rolling resistance: 7.12 kg/t – good
  • Rolling noise: 72.1 db (A) – average

Goodyear Vector 4Seasons Cargo

Goodyear Vector 4Seasons Cargo

Pros:

  • Very good control, safe driving behavior
  • Short braking distances and good aquaplaning protection in the wet conditions
  • Quiet tire with good damping

Cons:

  • Imbalanced traction/cornering ratio on snow
  • Slightly longer braking distances dry conditions

Snow Test:

  • Braking power: 18.7 meters – good
  • Lateral guidance: 3.29 m/s² – average
  • Traction: 1.71 m/s² – very good
  • Handling: 43.3 km/h – average

Wet Test:

  • Braking power: 35.3 meters – very good
  • Lateral guidance: 6.11 m/s² – very good
  • Handling: 64.3 km/h – very good
  • Longitudinal aquaplaning: 76.6 km/h – good
  • Aquaplaning across: 3.65 m/s² – average

Dry Asphalt Test:

  • Braking power: 48.3 meters – average
  • Handling: 85.1 km/h – good
  • Rolling resistance: 7.6 kg/t – good
  • Rolling noise: 71.7 db (A) – good

Maxxis Vansmart A/S AL2

Maxxis Vansmart A/S AL2

Pros:

  • Reliable on snow at a somewhat reduced level
  • The rough profile is advantageous here for older vehicles without ASR
  • Quite quiet

Cons:

  • Longer braking on all test surfaces
  • Sluggish reaction
  • Reduced cornering strength and slight tendency to oversteer on dry conditions

Snow Test:

  • Braking power: 19.4 meters – average
  • Lateral guidance: 3.26 m/s² – below average
  • Traction: 1.63 m/s² – average
  • Handling: 44.1 km / h – good

Wet Test:

  • Braking power: 38.7 meters – average
  • Lateral guidance: 5.96 m/s² – average
  • Handling: 62.6 km/h – average
  • Longitudinal aquaplaning: 78.2 km/h – very good
  • Aquaplaning across: 3.63 m/s² – average

Dry Asphalt Test:

  • Braking power: 49.2 meters – average
  • Handling: 84.6 km/h – average
  • Rolling resistance: 7.4 kg/t – good
  • Rolling noise: 71.8 db (A) – good

Vredestein Comtrac 2 Allseason

Vredestein Comtrac 2 Allseason

Pros:

  • Dynamic handling with strong cornering grip on snow
  • With the exception of the very poor braking performance, the driving dynamics are still acceptable.

Cons:

  • Very long braking distances on wet (devaluation) and dry asphalt
  • Little grip in wet corners
  • Very sluggish steering response
  • Loud rolling

Snow Test:

  • Braking power: 18.7 meters – good
  • Lateral guidance: 3.42 m/s² – very good
  • Traction: 1.67 m/s² – good
  • Handling: 44.3 km / h – good

Wet Test:

  • Braking power: 41.6 meters – insufficient
  • Lateral guidance: 6.08 m/s² – good
  • Handling: 63.4 km/h – good
  • Longitudinal aquaplaning: 76.3 km/h – good
  • Aquaplaning across: 4.02 m / s² – very good

Dry Asphalt Test:

  • Braking power: 50.5 meters – below average
  • Handling: 85.8 km / h – good
  • Rolling resistance: 7.4 kg/t – good
  • Rolling noise: 75.2 db (A) – insufficient

Motorhome Tires Final Thoughts and Remarks

Always keep your eyes open when buying tires for your motorhome. Supposedly cheap bargains that are still offered without the snowflake symbol will no longer be considered winter tires from 2024.

Cars, buses, trucks and also motorhomes that are driven in wintry conditions must wear winter or all-season tires with the so-called Alpine symbol from October 2024. Such tires have proven their suitability for winter compared to a reference tire.

Tires that only have the old M+S identification on the flank and were only allowed to be produced until December 31, 2017, are only allowed for snow and ice use until the end of September 2024.

In contrast to trucks and buses, approved winter tires must be fitted to all the wheels of cars and motorhomes. Trailers and, in the meantime, motorcycles again are exempt from the requirement for winter tires.

However, we strongly recommend that you fit suitable tires to caravans, at least if you plan to drive in winter. But don’t worry: high-quality all-weather tires as well as branded winter tires have been tested for the snowflake symbol for years and have long been labeled accordingly.

As a compromise: if you don’t drive your motorhome that often, especially if you don’t drive during winter time, all-weather tires are a sensible choice – especially for reducing costs.

However, they remain a compromise compared to real summer and winter tires. Under extreme conditions – such as snow or heat – they are inferior in most respects.

If you observe these restrictions but want to change: The ideal time is in autumn, because then the full profile is still available in winter without too much, or any, wear.

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